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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 398 (some duplicates have been removed)
help us to change and make the city more sustainable. if the go to copenhagen, traffic in the city looks like this. you had a lot of cars in the city center. now they have 30% or 50% every day. you have this bicycle idea. i do not know if we can put the audio. this will give your energy. despite changing the will you will save the energy. we can monitor what you are doing. they can collect information. all of these things you can share with your friends. you can put it on facebook. it is a very good way to increase the number of sites in copenhagen. instead collecting air miles, you collect green miles. this was the initial prototype. now we have these in cars. we are getting very close to its. hopefully, it will be here next year. >> come up on the stage. this is the vice president and director of the metropolitan policy program at the brookings institution. he will be joined by a bunch of other panelists for how far can innovations take our cities. >> thanks. while they get ready, i wanted to thank the sponsors here and think what you have done. you have taken a very broad view o
north in communities like atlantic city, ocean city, point pleasant, asbury park is where the devastation is. those iconic board walks ripped up. the wood scattered across the street. the sea water and the sand inundating those downtown areas. governor christie said -- told us 2.5 million people in the state without power could be eight days or longer before that full power is fully restored. we know the president is due here tomorrow. he will take a look firsthand at the damage with governor chris christie and representatives of fema and of course, as we said earlier, it is going to take a long time to get this back to where it should be. the damage is just absolutely remarkable looking at the jersey shore. all the way north down here toward the south. >> jennifer: so when are the residents going to be able to return to the area? >> reporter: well, that's obviously going to differ from community to community. and just how bad the damage is. we know that tonight high tide was another concern so authorities
york city hospital. the staff at nyu langone medical center was forced to evacuate hundreds of patients overnight including infants from the neo natal intensive care unit after backup power failed. they are still evacuating patients as we speak. we'll get to more on that in a moment, but first, let's go straight to meteorologist bill karins for the very latest. bill? >> good morning to you guys. and it's just starting to settle in. and once these pictures come in, it's just going to be incredible. the kind of damage that sandy created. over my shoulder here, you're looking at one of the strongest storms to go through the mid-atlantic region and caused the most destruction of our lifetime. this has never happened for a storm like this in the jersey shore of this intensity. lowest pressure readings ever in philadelphia and atlantic city, new jersey, and the storm surge, the highest ever measured in areas like new york city. that is so rare. and the effects we're just beginning to realize. and wait until we find out how long it's going to take for the new york subway to get running again.
. in atlantic city, part of the boardwalk is gone that we all grew up with. widespread flooding with parts of ocean city, maryland, and delaware is under water. midtown, manhattan, police closed off streets where a crane collapsed and remains dangling. more than 1.6 million homes are without power and trains, subways, and other transportation systems have been suspended. nearly 14,000 flights have been grounded. we begin our coverage tonight with nbc's tan truong. what's been developing along the water? >> reporter: well, the water is rising as high tide will hit around 8:00 and that's going to be the true test for rehoboth beach. in the hours going from 8:00 p.m. here throughout the evening and into midnight and well past midnight, he's worried that as the tide starts to increase and we get more of the winds coming off shore, it's going to push the water that you've seen behind me inland and up around this board lock and this is the same concern that you'll hear along coastal delaware. right now they have 6600 -- that's the latest count, 6600 power outages. so far, though, the good news i
there. all the while, resenting the african-american turnout machine. in the city of cleveland, ohio, african-american voters are 26 times more likely than white voters to use early in-person voting as their preferred way of voting. for this election in particular, even though it's been fine for every election in the past seven years, for this election in particular, early in person voting must be stopped. to the point of taking it to the supreme court of the united states with 28 days left before the election and meanwhile leaving the whole state's voting rules hanging. as ohio hits its voter registration deadline today and so many other states as well, what we know about how the parties have done on voter registration in the swing states opens a real interesting window into how the two parties are contesting the important states. this is a matter not just of national but of international importance. you can tell because the guardian newspaper from the uk has published a deep look into swing state voter registration numbers this past weaning. you can see their headline here. democra
are here in atlantic city. he is up in the chopper with governor christie. it was interesting. it was just governor christie. no other entourage greeting the president. just president and administrator fugate. they got on marine one which was brought up here and that's what they're doing now and just the three of them along with jack law the chief of staff on one helicopter and they're doing that tour as you know yesterday it was after governor christie did his first tell conference tour of the shore he was a different guy in the press briefing. clearly shaken him up. so then the pictures we have been seeing today, obviously, with going up in the -- it's just what you're seeing today and what people are seeing today you now understand the emotional response that governor christie had and others from new jersey had as they have seen the devastation up close so that's what they're doing now and you're right. you know, it is a picture and at the same time this is the best politics in a situation like this. >> and we actually heard from one of the congressman from the area, steve israel was on
? >> absolutely, most of these cities are cash strapped. they're financially mismanaged and it's an opportunity for them to put one more hand in the taxpayers' pockets. look, the root of this is not that they ned more money, they need to spend what they have more efficiently and overburdened with pensions they can't pay and they have too many government employees on the payroll and they're badly run, and asking a taxpayer to fund government inefficiency is the wrong way to go. >> brenda: well, jonas, we're already paying taxes, isn't that supposed to be covering what we get for this? >> well, those income taxes are artificially low. a lot of states like california are putting through a lot of tax increases. and we talked about the president, but california has a proposition to super tax million dollar earners, you need regress seive taxes to go along with that, and charging fees for all the things the states are paying for, roads, bridges, i'm all for it because you can't just squeeze the same group for higher income taxes, and called broaden the base. >> brenda: you like that idea. >> i late t
the substance. >> as we said, it was chilly. andrea, chuck, thank you both >>> here in new york city late today, federal authorities revealed they have arrested a man they say was plotting to blow up the new york city headquarters of the federal reserve. a big and obvious symbol of this nation's financial system. our justice correspondent, pete williams, has been working on this story from our d.c. news room. he is with us tonight with details, good evening. >> reporter: brian, the fbi says this plot was the idea of a 21-year-old college student from bangladesh. he was arrested after riding in a van that he thought carried a powerful bomb that agents say he assumed was one that would kill women and children. his target, the new york offices say, was a bank building, he was arrested later in federal court charged with attempting to try to set off the powerful bomb. he was identified as quazi nafis, and came to the country on a student visa, but intended to carry out a terror attack. by july, he was trying to recruit people, meeting one man several times in new york central park, but that man tur
. >> good morning. it is monday, october 29th. that's ocean city, maryland, you're looking at right now. with us on set, msnbc contributor mike barnicle and msnbc and "time" senior political analyst, mark halperin. we'll get right to the latest on hurricane sandy. flights are canceled. subways are shut down and millions of people are bracing for an historic storm up and down the eastern seaboard. high winds and rains are beginning to hit places like ocean city, maryland. hurricane sandy will drench areas from north carolina to new england and behind the initial impact, what could be a devastating storm surge. let's go straight to meteorologist bill karins with the very latest on where the hurricane's at. bill. >> good morning to you, mika. and this storm is on schedule, nothing has changed. if anything, it's a little stronger than what we thought it would be at this point. and it's going to be moving on shore within the next 12 to 18 hours. this will be a 24-hour period for areas from the northern mid-atlantic, washington, d.c., all the way through boston that a lot of us will never for
calls the revolving door of repeat offenders in and out of the city. if you drive around they look like they are on the verge of becoming permanent badlands. this will erode any hope of the city's much promised and long talk about revitalization. we need drastic measures. >> let me give you what we're doing. first of all operation pressure point. states who are working with wellington police officers in the city. i have been out there with them, i have been at east 24th street. talk to the residence and they love seeing the people out of control. the state police working with probation and parole officers as well as use probation and parole officers. this is in the public safety area. the attorney-general's office is making sure we have the right prosecution so folks stay behind bars. there also appearing in violation of probation hearings. that is a piece of it. there's no question that public safety is a piece of it. the other is some of the social issues. that is why we opened 10 community centers. kids have a place to go. we opened a curfew center to make sure that kids had a place
in 17 states without power. it could be days before the power is restored. seven of 10 new york city tunnels flooded. some say is a freak storm that cannot be tied to climate change. we will get your take on that. republicans -- 202-585-3881. democrats -- 202-585-3880. independence -- 202-585-3882. you can send us a tweet @cspanwj. we will begin with the editorial page. and their thoughts on this. sandy signals an era of extreme weather. this is what the editorial pages to say. even before citi turned ashore near publix city -- debate was raising in scientific and government circles over whether the monster hurricane nor'easter was a spawn of global warming. a lot of the conclusion is that sandy would have happened with or without climate change. but the extra heat and humidity. this much seems beyond speak. because of man-made warming, the united states is in an era of extreme weather events. that is with usa today has to say. contrast that with the washington times editorial page. franken storm. it was not caused the industrial revolution. a 2010 study by the national hurricane sys
for catholic charities here in new york city, has ended up becoming a really important thing in american presidential politics. honestly, the biggest reason it is really important is because of its timing. there are other dinners like this. the gridiron dinner in washington or the alfalfa dinner or the correspondence dinner. there are other dinners that are fancy politics proms, essentially. where you get a sitting president or very high-level politician showing up in tuxedos and gowns and telling jokes and sharing stages with people they otherwise would not be sharing stages with. that happens. right? there are those events in washington and elsewhere around the country. but this one that you are looking at right here is different. because this one happens now. a couple of weeks before the election. and it's always timed like that. every time. and traditionally, both presidential candidates go to these things. i mean, there are some years where the dinner conflicts directly with the debate or rarely one of the candidates will decide to blow this dinner off. walter mondale did that 1984.
to realize that the south is a heck of a lot more integrated than some of the coastal cities. it is not memphis or mobile that is stuck in segregation, it is l.a. and new york. for the past decade, african-americans from the north have been moving south in huge numbers. it is a total reverse of the great migration of the 1940s and 1950s when large parts of the southern black population moved north to places like chicago, detroit, and new york. but now blacks are coming back to this out. impossible, they cry. don't they know that the south is full of rednecks and racists? will black people know to the contrary is that the south has much better jobs and a better economic future and more importantly, it's a better place to raise their children. put it this way, kids don't learn to say thank you and liberal public public schools. they learn that in places like montgomery and greenville. the mason-dixon line still shows up en masse. but some think it is better to be on the southern side. how much better? the numbers do not lie. according to the latest census figures, the south was
a family together while you're serving on a city council. i totally agree with you that we all need to play a part of serving our country. it starts i think with people like yourself speaking out more. i think we need, again, i'm speaking personally here, i think when you get more and more people be conscious of the fact that, you know, kennedy was right. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. sometimes democrats are right. [laughter] >> maybe we should end it there. [laughter] >> i said sometimes. so i would say that your point is a very important one, and i certainly personally would hope that anybody was watching this pays attention to your concerns. because being a military wife is now less easy than serving in the military. i know. i've been working with the military for more than 35 years. i have friends who lost their husbands, had to bring up kids on their own. i had other friends, many navy and marine corps friends that spent months on in paying the bills, dealing with the kids, doing the carpool, taking care of the house, working the job, m
will be your low in pierre and 26° in omaha and 26 in garden city, very cold out here and you will need to pump up the heat and grab the jack and sweater and a lot of the cold air will be lingering for several days, to come, you will notice the cold air will not be leaving quickly, otherwise a quick shot of the cold front, large system, stretching across portions of new england producing showers, already and stretching into parts of the southeast across tennessee and a look at the snowfall, still falling out across western parts of nebraska and kansas, light stuff and down in through portions, again of -- parts of eastern colorado out here and we are seeing the snowfall coming down and slippery roadways, a big issue, for the rest of today and early tomorrow morning and current temperatures, 40s across the midwest and not bad across the northeast, and 62 in new york city and 50 in cleveland and look at tomorrow's high temperature, in new york city, only 54 degrees, really you will notice a difference and, the cold air making it as far south as raleigh, north carolina, 58 degrees, for your high t
're going to hear how the two cities are teaming up with the american beverage foundation to see which town can get healthier. this morning the moderator of the first presidential debate jim lehrer will be here on set. >> it's all his fault. >> romney adviser dan senor will be here to give us a preview of the candidate's foreign policy address today. and famed novelist salman rushdie will join us. >>> up next, the top stories in the "politico playbook." first, bill karins, the potted plant. >> i love you, bill. i love you. >> mika's a little angry today. >> i had to get up early. >> she's really upset. that's a nice catch. mika's upset. you know what i'm going to say? jobs numbers! you're right. >> i am. >> i know you are. >> i know you want to say it in a way that you think i'm not -- >> mika's right. >> i have charts. would you like them? good. >> let me grab this by the reins here. let me take you out the door on this columbus day. good morning, everyone. we are watching clearing skies in new england, not going to last long. bring the umbrella today if you're in the d.c., baltimore, virg
fadden and bill weir in new york city, this is a special edition of "nightline," one-on-one, the candidates debate, october 3rd, 2012. >> good evening, i'm terry moran. tonight, a high stakes showdown as president barack obama and mitt romney took the stage in denver to go head to head for the first time. an estimated 60 million americans tuned in to watch this critical moment in an often contentious presidential campaign with the election just 34 days away. crucial swing voters still undecided. with romney trailing in the polls, time running short, tonight could be his turning point. here's how it went down. they came out, shook hands, ready for the main event. but president obama began soft, very soft. a shoutout to the first lady. >> i just want to wish, sweetie, you happy anniversary and let you know that a year from now, we will not be celebrating it in front of 40 million people. >> romney graciously followed suit with an easy quip. >> congratulations to you, mr. president, on your anniversary. i'm sure this was the most romantic place you could imagine, here with me. >> reporter: and then t
moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is a special edition of "nightline," one-on-one, the vice presidential debate. >> good evening, i'm terry moran. tonight, a feisty on-stage showdown as vice president joe biden and his republican challenger paul ryan went head-to-head for the first and only time, with time running short here. the stakes and the tension seemed especially high, you a new polls showing a spike in support of mitt rom near after president obama's stumble in last week's debate. so, here's how it all went down tonight. >> vice president joe biden and congressman paul ryan. >> reporter: from the get-go, this was a sharper, livelier debate. >> if you do harm to america, we will track you to the gates of hell. >> what we are watching is the unraveling of the obama foreign policy. >> reporter: joe biden and paul ryan came ready to rumble. ryan, the intense young gun. biden, the wily elder statesman who grinned like an old possum as he listened to ryan's attacks. then came right back at him, biden style. >> with all due respect, that's a bunch of mulark
to the cities. so with that, i'm going to turn this over to alex who will step us through the feel-good fallacies and the rise of the anti-scientific left. we'll have time for q&a afterward because i'm going to reach behind alex and pop him with the book if he runs too late. but over to you, and thank you for joining us. alex? >> thank you for that very kind introduction. our book is "science left behind." we call it feel-good fallacies and the rise of the anti-scientist left. and as ken said, my name's alex, and i got my ph.d. in microbiology, and i'm the editor of real clear science.com. just a little bit about me, my background is entirely microbiology. a friend of mine said i looked like an ubergeek in that picture. that's me working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely smelly bacteria this that thing. i went to the university of washington 2004 and got my be ph.d. in 2010, and identify been in the real -- i've been in the real world for two years. so my personal science philosophy is straightforward and simple. science should always come before politics x th
city. we are going to see the leaves on the trees make it like a sail. so, when the winds are gusting and the grounds are soft because of the rain, several downed trees on the power lines and dealing with power outages through the weekend into next week. it's one of the biggest concerns. chris? >> thank you. that report from dillen drier. >> eise, friends of democracy aimed at electing candidates who champion campaign finance reform and my colleague. the wonderful heather mcgee and senior editor and staff writer at the new yorker magazine. they just endorsed barack obama and all the talk about the des moines register. people are overlooking the fact he bagged "the new york times" and the new yorker. hurricane sandy caused president obama and mitt romney to cancel events in virginia. this is important because with only nine days left until election day, it comes down to math and geography, the votes and the map. the map shrunk to seven swing states, virginia, iowa, new hampshire, wisconsin and ohio are all in play this cycle. president obama can count on 243 electoral votes that will g
to give a dollar. now, here's the thing. when 9/11 happened in new york city...: they waived the stafford act, said, this is too serious a problem. we can't expect new york city to rebuild on its own. forget that dollar you have to put in. that was the right thing to do. when hurricane andrew struck in florida, people said, look at this devastation! we don't expect to you come up with the money. here! here's the money to rebuild. we are not going to wait for to you scratch it together because you are part of the american family. what's happening down in new orleans? where's your dollar? where's your stafford act mony? makes no sense. tells me the bullet hasn't been taken out. [applause] tells me that somehow the people down in new orleans, they don't care about as much. >> sean: now, this notion that the government is turning its back on african-american communities while doing all it can for predominantly white areas is repeated throughout the speech. look at this. >> that's why we need additional federal public transportation dollars loaned to the highest need community. we don't need t
and an otherwise industrial city, one of the big car manufacturers add that time, there was a certain amount of drift between the two. it was great fun. i hung out with a lot of the -- all of the reporters there except for me were oxford graduates. i learned a lot. i learned a lot from them. a very good time. i came in on my day off. the editor was a man named to w. harford thomas. i came there to pick up my mail because it was my fixed address, i was moving from one rooming house to another. sometimes only half a day, but i had one day off a week. this was a saturday. i went to pick up my mail, and i was wearing a t-shirt. it was a summer. when i picked up my mail, when i came into the office the next day there was a note in my pigeon hole from w. harford thomas that said, mr. safer, we at "the mail" generally prefer dark clothing. >> if it had been a dark t- shirt, you would have been alright. >> he meant -- and certainly not with a pink tie. >> there are always those moments in life that make a difference and change everything. what was the first one for you? >> certainly the day -- i was
thing to help prevent crime in cities is to bring opportunity in the inner cities. teach people good discipline, good character. that is civil society. that's what charities and churches do. >> paul ryan and mitt romney say churches and charities are the only antidote to poverty. >>> another is ordering to vote for mitt romney. we'll read the letter where he admits it. >>> and which tape is a better window into mitt romney's window for america, the denver debate or the 47% tape? ahead, my commentary on why this country can't afford to get fooled again. stay top of mind with customers? from deals that bring them in with an offer... to social media promotions that turn fans into customers... to events that engage and create buzz... to e-mails that keep loyal customers coming back, our easy-to-use tools will keep you in front of your customers. see what's right for you at constantcontact.com/try. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." the group nuns on the bus is hitting the road tomorrow kicking off another leg of their antipoverty tour. this time in the state of ohio. the organization has
schweitzer, great to have you with us. >>> the best thing to help prevent crime in cities is to bring opportunity in the inner cities. teach people good discipline, good character. that is civil society. that's what charities and churches do. >> paul ryan and mitt romney say churches and charities are the only antidote to poverty. >>> another is ordering to vote for mitt romney. we'll read the letter where he admits it. >>> and which tape is a better window into mitt romney's window for america, the denver debate or the 47% tape? ahead, my commentary on why this country can't afford to get fooled again. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." the group nuns on the bus is hitting the road tomorrow kicking off another leg of their antipoverty tour. this time in the state of ohio. the organization has invited mitt romney and paul ryan as well as president obama and vice president biden to discuss the issue of poverty in cincinnati. so far neither has accepted the invitation. in the meantime, paul ryan isn't backing down from his budget which would gut the nation's social safety net. had propo
. it's a dream realized through museum curator kenneth phillips who has long wanted his city, and especially the city's kids, to get a real feel for the danger and romance and wonder of space flight. >> every time he comes back to that fire ball and that's the real deal you're looking at. >> reporter: and look at it they've been doing. thousands along the 12-mile route of what l.a. mayor antonio villaraigosa has called the mother of all parades. >> i'm speechless. >> just an icon of america. >> really a phenomenal experience. >> reporter: there have been complaints about the 400 trees cut down along the route. though they'll be replaced two for one. and some shop keepers are lamenting lost business and some residents the fact that they can't get close to the spectacle in their own neighborhoods. >> they want to close off the streets so that we can't even be on the sidewalk. >> reporter: but "endeavour's" logbook is about to record its final entry. it's the real thing. >> every mark you see, every dent you see, everything that is there is revealing what the orbiter did and why
to citi, taking taking the ceo role five years ago, and then during the financial crisis agreeing to work for a dollar, getting bashed and bashed again by the president by the populous, and he probably just said to himself look, i'm done. they don't want to pay me commiserate with one of my colleagues are making, i can't work for a dollar any more. i can't continue this without getting compensated. >> cenk: unbelieve! he didn't make a dollar last year. he made $15 million last year. there was a three-year stretch in which they lost--let me tell you--27% of their value and he made $43 million in those three years. but what is maria barteroma going to do? oh get him a blanket. cnbc might be worse than fox news how much they love the rich, how conservative they are, how ridiculous they are is that enough? i think that's enough. all right when we come back stop and frisk in new york city, who do they do it to? shockingly enough blacks and latinos, do they go too far? of course, we'll tell you when we come back. >> what are you touching me for? >> he told me he was going to go through my pocke
city on the planet. we're right here, right down the street from the united states capitol. good to have you with us today. lots and lots to talk about and more post-debate commentary about president obama's comments on libya and mr. romney's comments on governor romney's comments, i should say on coal and other energy issues all across the board the debate continues leading up to the next presidential debate which is monday. i don't know where this one is. peter? >> i knew and now i forgot. i'll find out. >> bill: doesn't matter where it is. we'll be there with you watching it and talking about it. today, more spillover from tuesday night's debate. wherever you happen to be, thank you for joining us, whether you're watching or listening on your local progressive talk radio station or watching on current tv, listening to sirius x.m., this is the place to start your day. i appreciate the fact that you do so. we are here with the entire team this morning. peter ogborn and dan henning hello, guys. >> good morn
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 398 (some duplicates have been removed)

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